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Civil War Parole Document
Andrew Pizzini, Jr.
VMI Archives Manuscript #00109

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Andrew Pizzini photo 

About the Pizzini document

This document is a typical example of the paroles issued to Confederate prisoners at the end of the Civil War.

Andrew Pizzini, Jr. (at left, circa 1864) was born on September 24, 1846 in Richmond, Virginia. His father was Juan Pizzini, a native of Corsica who for many years served as the Italian Consul in Richmond. His mother was Celeste Eulalie Pizzini, of French descent.

Pizzini was still a schoolboy at the beginning of the Civil War. He enlisted as a Private in the First Virginia Infantry, but was discharged in September 1861 so that he could attend the Virginia Military Institute. He enrolled at VMI in December 1861 as a member of the Class of 1865, and continued until graduation. As a cadet, he fought in the Battle of New Market (May 15, 1864) as a cadet 1st Sergeant, Company B. In June 1864 he was promoted to second Cadet Captain, commanding Company D.

Following the destruction of many Institute buildings by General David Hunter in June 1864, the Corps of Cadets was furloughed several months. In December 1864 academic exercises resumed at the Alms House in Richmond, Virginia, VMI's temporary headquarters. As the war drew to a close, the cadets were assigned to aid in the defense of Richmond, where Pizzini surrendered in April 1865.

For 17 years after the war Pizzini was a merchant in Richmond. He subsequently became interested in the new electric power industry and was president of the city's Electrical Street Railways Light and Power Companies. He died on January 31, 1913.
 

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