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Samuel Brooke Civil War Papers
Manuscript #221

 Brooke Papers detail(1) Civil War Manuscripts Home 

 "Marching I do detest and fighting I love no better."  

About the Papers:
Samuel Selden Brooke was born on November 10, 1841 in Stafford County, Virginia, the son of Samuel Selden Brooke, Sr. and Angelina Edrington. Brooke enrolled at the Virginia Military Institute in July 1857 and was a cadet for one year. He subsequently attended the University of Virginia, and in April 1861 he joined the Confederate Army. In May 1861 he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, Company I, 47th Virginia Infantry Regiment; in May 1862 he was promoted to Captain. He served with this unit until the end of the Civil War.

After the war, Brooke resided in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where he studied law and opened a practice. In 1882 he moved to Roanoke, VA, where he was a newspaper editor and Clerk of Court. He married Bettie Lewis Young in 1872; they had 6 children (Samuel, Henry, Edgar, Vena, Sarah, and Cary). Brooke died January 10, 1918 in Roanoke.

Read the full text letters (as listed below)
  • 1862 April 17.
    From Brooke's sister, writing from Fredericksburg, Virginia. She describes the retreat of the Confederate troops and her fear of the impending occupation of the city by Union troops commanded by Gen. Augur.
  • 1862 May 17.
    From Brooke's aunt, writing from Richmond, VA. Gives Sam the news of his mother's death; laments the "terrible feature of this war that it cuts off all communication with those we love"; family leaving Richmond to go to countryside.
  • 1862 June 26.
    From Brooke's aunt, writing from Fluvanna, VA. Is worried about Sam; mentions family behind enemy lines in Fredericksburg; illness in family; other family concerns.
  • 1863 August 18.
    From Samuel to his sister, writing from the camp of the 47th Virginia Infantry Regiment near Orange Court House, VA. "Marching I do detest and fighting I love no better."
  • 1864 March 27.
    From Samuel to his sister, writing from the camp of the 47th Virginia Infantry Regiment near Orange Court House, VA. "I...do not expect to see you all again until this campaign is over if I am so fortunate as to survive the storm that will soon burst over us."
View other Documents (listed below)
  • Commission document, 1861. Signed by Virginia Governor John Letcher.
  • Special Orders, December 1864. Recruiting trip authorized.
  • Amnesty oath, 1865.&

For more information about the 47th Virginia Infantry Regiment, see the following book:
Musselman, Homer D. 47th Virginia Infantry. (H. E. Howard, Inc., Lynchburg, VA, 1991).