How to Respond

The only real risk is to do nothing. 

When you notice a cadet in distress, your response can make all the difference. Consider:

  • speaking directly with the cadet, or
  • consulting with an Institute counselor for referral

Choosing a pathway:

If you have a relationship with the cadet (even the smallest degree of rapport) and notice signs of distress, your best option may be to talk with him or her directly. Begin the conversation by expressing your concern. (See “speak directly with the cadet”)

If you do not really know the cadet (e.g., cadet is in your large lecture class, is a resident in your building, but not on your floor), but notice signs of distress or are aware of a pattern of concerning behavior, it may be more comfortable or effective to contact the Center for Cadet Counseling (See our "Appointments & Contacts" page)

Your decision may also be influenced by: 

  • your level of experience
  • the nature or severity of the problem
  • your ability to give time to the situation
  • a variety of other personal factors

In any given situation, there are likely to be several "right ways" to reach out in a caring manner.

If you are a faculty member, here is an online handbook just for you: