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Kathy Wirtanen
Administrative, Facility
& Conference Assistant

P:  (540) 464-7361
F: (540) 464-7396

Center for Leadership & Ethics
VMI, Marshall Hall
500 Anderson Drive
Lexington, VA  24450

Schedule and Program Information

77th Annual Meeting of the Society of Military History
20 – 23 May 2010
Marshall Hall, Center for Leadership and Ethics, Virginia Military Institute
updated 7 May

Overview of Meeting Schedule(pdf format)

Thursday, May 20
12:00 pm              7:00 pm                Registration (Marshall Hall, Center for Leadership & Ethics (CLE))
12:00 pm              4:00 pm                SMH Executive Board Meeting - Col Alto Hampton Inn
12:00 pm              4:00 pm                Exhibitor set up, Marshall Hall, CLE
5:30pm                 8:00 pm                Welcoming Barbeque Dinner – Tent, VMI Parade Ground 

Friday, May 21
7:30 am                8:30 am                JMH Editorial Board Breakfast
8:00 am                5:00 pm                Registration – Marshall Hall, CLE
8:00 am                6:00 pm                Visit Exhibits – Marshall Hall, CLE
8:30 am                9:45 am                Session 1
9:45 am                10:00 am              Break
10:15 am              11:30 am              Session 2
11:45am               1:00 pm                Awards Luncheon - Marshall Hall, CLE
1:30 pm                5:30 pm                Tour: D-Day Memorial, Bedford, Virginia
1:30 pm                3:00 pm                Session 3
3:00 pm                3:15 pm                Break
3:15 pm                4:45 pm                Session 4
5:30 pm                6:30 pm                Graduate Student Reception – George C. Marshall Museum Lobby
Evening                                             Dinner on-your-own

Saturday, May 22  
8:00 am                5:00 pm                Registration - Marshall Hall, CLE
8:00 am                5:00 pm                Visit Exhibits – Marshall Hall, CLE
8:30 am                9:45 am                Session 5
9:45 am                10:15 am              Break
10:15 am              11:30 am              Session 6
11:30 am              1:00 pm                Lunch on own
12:00 pm              5:00 pm                Staff Ride: New Market Battlefield
1:30 pm                3:00 pm                Session 7
3:00 pm                3:15 pm                Break
3:15 pm                4:45 pm                Session 8
6:00 pm                7:00 pm                Reception – Marshall Hall, CLE
7:15 pm                10:00 pm              Banquet – Marshall Hall, CLE

Sunday, May 23
7:30 am                8:30 am                SMH Business Meeting - GCMF, Pogue Auditorium
8:00 am               12:00 pm               Registration – Marshall Hall, CLE
8:00 am               12:00 pm               Visit Exhibits - Marshall Hall, CLE
8:30am                10:00 am               Session 9
10:00 am             10:30 am               Break
10:30 am             11:45 am               Session 10
12:00 pm             2:00 pm                 Exhibitor take down

 

2010 SMH Panels and Sessions
updated 26 March
(pdf version) (Matrix of panel schedule)

Session One: Friday, 0830-0945

Shenandoah:  “Causes Forgotten: Military Operations in the Pacific All But Lost to History”

Chair:  Hal M. Friedman, Henry Ford Community College

Commentator: Russell Hart, Hawaii Pacific University

Papers:           

“The Paulet Affair of 1843: A Turning Point in the Use of Coercive Force in Anglo-Hawaiian Relations during the Years 1825-1854?” Brendan Bliss, Hawaii Pacific University

“Like a Good Neighbor: The U.S. Navy’s Diplomatic Mission in South America in the 1930s”  Joel Christiansen, West Virginia University

“A Quiet Day in Luganville: The Imprint of the U.S. Military Occupation on Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, in WWII”  Justin Vance, Hawaii Pacific University

 

New Market:  “From Creation to Professionalization: Studies in US Army Logistics, 1783-1865”

Chair: Steven J. Rauch, U.S. Army Signal Center of Excellence

Commentator: COL Wade Sokolosky, 23rd Quartermaster Brigade

Papers:           

“Logistics Driving Operations: The Influence of Logistics on McClellan’s Peninsula Campaign (1862) and Grant’s Overland Campaign (1864)”  Curtis S. King, U.S. Army Combat Studies Institute

“’The Great Question of the Campaign Was One of Supplies’: Logistics and Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign”  J. Britt McCarley, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

“’Fatal Mismanagements and Neglects’: Assessing the Military and Economic Impact of Contracting Supply during the War for the Old Northwest”  James K. Perrin, Jr., Ohio State University

 

Gillis Theater (500):   “National Endowment for the Humanities Information Session and Grants Workshop”   Presidential Panel Sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities

Panelists:         Douglas M. Arnold, National Endowment for the Humanities and Malcolm “Kip” Muir, Virginia Military Institute

Dr. Arnold will describe current grant opportunities at the National Endowment for the Humanities and give examples of recent grant awards in military history.  He will also discuss special NEH programs (including the new Bridging Cultures initiative), describe the Endowment's evaluation process, and offer grant-writing tips.  Dr. Muir will discuss a recent NEH Challenge Grant at Virginia Military Institute for a center for military history and strategic analysis.  A question-and-answer period will follow.

 

 

Pogue Auditorium (100):  “Paras, Pariahs, Precision, and Revision: Airpower Causes Won Not Lost”

Chair:  Robert H. Berlin, Society for Military History

Commentator: Sebastian Cox, Air Historical Branch (RAF), UK Ministry of Defence

Papers:           

“Bombers, ‘Butchers’, and Britain’s Bête Noire: Reappraising RAF Bomber Command’s Role in WWII”  Robert S. Ehlers, Jr., U.S. Air Force School of Advanced Air and Space Studies

“Iron Men, Silver Wings: Rethinking Vertical Envelopment in World War II”  Donald A. MacCuish, U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff College

”Whirlwind, Whiz Kids, Waziristan, and the Realization of the Airpower Cause”  John  G. Terino , U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff College

 

Marshall Library (40):  “Losses, Lessons, Lumières: Military Enlightenment in Eighteenth-century France”

Chair:  Jacqueline Whitt, U.S. Military Academy

Commentator:  Jacqueline Whitt, U.S. Military Academy

Papers:           

“Unwitting Sacrifice: The Noble Officer Corps and the Rise of the French Soldier, 1760-1789”  Julia Osman, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

“Embracing the Epicene: Feminist Military Reform in the Enlightenment French Army”  Christy Pichichero, Stanford University

“From a Lost War to a New Paradise: America’s Indians and Tahitians through the Eyes of Bougainville”  Christian A. Crouch, Bard College

 

Moody Activities Room (100):  “Forgotten Fronts of the First World War”

Chair:  Mark E. Grotelueschen, U.S. Air Force Academy

Commentator: Eric W. Osborne, Virginia Military Institute

Papers:           

“’Goodbyeeeee and Fuck You!’  Masculinity, Identity, and Swearing among Canada’s Great War Soldiers”  Tim Cook, Canadian War Museum

“Home Front Natal: A South African Province during the Great War”  Paul S. Thompson, University of KwaZulu-Natal

“Sweetness and War: An Introductory Examination of the Role of Sugar during the First World War”  Robert Shafer, Pennsylvania State University

 

Moody Boardroom (25):  “Preparing to Win: Perspectives on the U.S. Army in the Interwar Period”

Chair:  Stephen A. Bourque, U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies

Commentator: Joseph C. Fitzharris, University of St. Thomas

Papers:           

“Riflemen and Guardsmen: The NRA, the NGA, and the Transformation of the Army”  Barry M. Stentiford, U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies

“Mobile Firepower: U.S. Army Tanks and Mechanization in the Interwar Period”  Dan C. Fullerton, U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies

“Battlefield Frameworks, Operational Art, and Reality, 1918-1945”  Peter J. Schifferle, U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies

 


Session Two: Friday, 1015-1130

Shenandoah (50):  “The Tenuous Cords of Imperial Unity: Britain and the Commonwealth during the Second World War and After”

Chair:  David J. Bercuson, University of Calgary

Commentator: David J. Bercuson, University of Calgary

Papers:           

“Tradition and Pragmatism: Anglo-Canadian Defense Relations after the Second World War”  Peter Archambault, Defence Research and Development Canada, Centre for Operational Research and Analysis

 “Australia in Transition: Anglo-Australian Relations, 1939-1945”  Jeffrey Grey, Australian Defence Force Academy

“Preparing to Fight the Bear: The Canadian Army at the Nexus of the North Atlantic Triangle”  Alexander W. G. Herd, University of Calgary

 

Gillis Theater (500):  “Counterinsurgency Across History” (A Roundtable Presentation)

Chair:              H. R. McMaster, U.S. Army Capabilities Integration Center, Training and Doctrine Command

Panelists:         Andrew J. Birtle, U.S. Army Center for Military History

                        Max Boot, Council on Foreign Relations

                        Mark Moyar, U.S. Marine Corps University

 

Pogue Auditorium (100):  “Causes Won and Lost: Women’s Wartime and Peacetime Contributions and Women’s Rights”   Presidential Panel Sponsored by the Minerva Center

Chair: Kara Dixon Vuic, Bridgewater College

Commentator: D’Ann Campbell, Montana State University, Billings

Papers:           

“Japanese Women in a ‘Lost War’: Loyalty and Betrayal in a State of War”  Haruko Taya Cook & Theodore F. Cook, William Paterson University

“Women at War: Organizing Resistance in France during WWII”  Rita Kramer, Independent Scholar

“An Incremental Revolution: American Women and War, 1980 to 2010”  Robert Lance Janda, Cameron University

 


Marshall Library (40):  “The U.S. Army and Joint Command in the War against Japan”

Chair: Edward M. Coffman, University of Wisconsin, Madison (Emeritus)

Commentator: Edward Drea, Independent Scholar

Papers:           

“The Interwar Army and the Rising Sun”  Harold R. Winton, U.S. Air Force School of Advanced Air and Space Studies

“Instrument of Revenge: The 1st Cavalry Division in the Pacific War against Japan”  Peter Mansoor, Ohio State University

“MacArthur’s Lieutenants and the Schoolhouse of War”  Kevin C. Holzimmer, U.S. Air Force School of Advanced Air and Space Studies

 

Moody Activities Room (100):  “Warfare and Culture (continued): Operational Connections”

Chair: Wayne E. Lee, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Commentator:  Stephen Morillo, Wabash College

Papers:           

“Of Bureaucrats & Bandits: Anti-Rebel Strategy at the End of the Ming Dynasty”  Kenneth M. Swope, Ball State University

“Forbearance in Battle: Class, Culture, and Combat in Early Modern Europe”  John A. Lynn, Northwestern University

“Sherman’s Armies in 1864: A Study in Organizational Culture”  Mark Grimsley, Ohio State University

 

Moody Board Room (25):  “The Public Image of the American Sea Services in the Early Twentieth Century”

Chair: Aaron B. O’Connell, U.S. Naval Academy

Commentator: Charles P. Niemeyer, USMC History

Papers:           

“Esprit de Marine Corps: The Making of the Modern Marine Corps through Public Relations, 1905-1918”  Colin M. Colbourn, University of Southern Mississippi

“’Always Fightin’ Men’: Identity and the Marine Corps during the Veracruz Incident”  Heather Pace Marshall, Duke University

“Finest Examples of American Manhood: The Ideal Sailor and the Construction of Masculinity in the Interwar Navy”  Ryan D. Wadle, Texas A&M University

 


Session Three: Friday, 1330-1500

Shenandoah (50):  “New Perspectives in Nineteenth-Century Naval History”

Chair: Sarandis “Randy” Papadopoulous, Naval History and Heritage Command

Commentator: Jennifer Lyn Speelman, The Citadel

Papers:           

“Charting Sea Space: Hydrography and the U.S. Navy in the Nineteenth Century”  Jason W. Smith, Temple University

“The President-Little Belt Affair: A Study in Causation”  Joshua Wolf, Temple University

“The Politics of American and British Naval Strategy in the War of 1812”  Stephen Budiansky, Independent Scholar

 

Gillis Theater (500): “What is Victory?”

Chair: Robert M. Citino, University of North Texas

Commentator: J. Boone Bartholomees, Jr., U.S. Army War College

Papers:           

“A Strategy of Tactics: What Population-centric Counterinsurgency Has Done to the American Army”  Gian P. Gentile, U.S. Military Academy

“In Praise of Exhaustion: Breaking Will with a Grand Strategy of Contextual Change”  Gail E. S. Yoshitani,  U.S. Military Academy

“Reframing the Historical Problematic of War, Insurgency, and Victory”  Jonathan E. Gumz, U.S. Military Academy

 

Pogue Auditorium (100):  “Military Frontiers in American History”

Chair:  Gregory J. W. Urwin, Temple University

Commentator: Philip D. Dillard, James Madison University

Papers:           

“One Cause Won, Two Causes Lost, a Fourth Cause Continued, a Fifth Bribed Away, and a Sixth Defined Out of Existence: Conflicts of the Rio Grande Valley, 1836-1876”   Irving W. Levinson, University of Texas, Pan-American

“’His Majesty’s Faithful Indian Allies’: Kennedy’s Corps and the Anglo-Provincial Victory over the Cherokees, 1761”  Daniel J. Tortora, Duke University

“Scapegoat? Colonel Edwin V. Sumner and the Topeka Dispersal of 1856”   Durwood Ball, University of New Mexico

 


Marshall Library (40):  “Causes and Effects; Representing Soldiering in the Era of the All-Volunteer Military”

Chair:  Janet G. Valentine, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

Commentator: Michael J. Allen, Northwestern University

Papers:           

“Army Games: America’s Virtual Soldiers”  Beth Bailey, Temple University

“Representing American Soldiers in the Nearly Invisible Women in Military Service for America Memorial”  Kristin Ann Hass, University of Michigan

“’No One Put a Gun to Their Head and Forced Them to Come Here’: Representing the All-Volunteer Army in Narratives on the ‘War on Terror’”  David Kieran, Washington University

 

Moody Activities Room (100):  “Airpower Causes in the Shadow of the Cold War”

Chair:  Douglas Streusand, U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College

Commentator: Douglas Streusand, U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College

Papers:           

“Air Power’s Evangelists: The Men and Women Who Sold Airpower through Popular Culture, 1945-1963”  Steven C. Call, Broome Community College

“General Otto Weyland and the Origins of an Expeditionary Air Force: USAF Tactical Air Command and Power Projection, 1956-1960“  Paul D. Gelpi, Jr., U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College

“General Paul Adams and Joint Strike Command: A Failed Opportunity for Enhanced Close Air Support”  Michael Perry May, U.S. Air Force Air University

 

Moody Board Room (25):  “Some Battles Won and Lost in Military Medicine”

Chair:  Justin Woodson, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Commentator: Justin Woodson, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Papers:           

“Medical and Surgical Care in the Russo-Japanese War”  Justin Barr, Yale University

“Some Problems in Saving Lives: Why and How Forward Surgery Was Brought to Battlefields”   William Sanders Marble, U.S. Army Office of Medical History

“A Battle Won and Lost: Allied Medical Support during Operation Market-Garden”  Stephen C. Craig, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

 


Session Four: Friday, 1515-1645

Shenandoah (50):  “Native American Warfare in 17th Century New England: Reactions and Adjustments to European Contact and Colonization”

Chair: John F. Guilmartin, Jr., Ohio State University

Commentator: Joseph Fischer, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

Papers:           

“The Evolution of Native Warfare in Southern New England: 1200-1637”  Kevin A. McBride, University of Connecticut

“Native Perspectives on Violence in War and the Consequences of the Mystic Massacre”  Matthew S. Muehlbauer, U.S. Military Academy

“Maintaining the Initiative: The Connecticut Colony-Mohegan-Pequot Alliance on the Offensive”  Jason W. Warren, U.S. Military Academy

 

New Market (50):  “The Southern Way of War: The Lost Cause and the Southern Military Tradition”

Chair: Richard B. McCaslin, University of North Texas

Commentator: Jennifer D. Keene, Chapman University

Papers:           

“The Texas Brigade and the Lost Cause”  Susannah J. Ural, University of Southern Mississippi

“Picking Up the White Man’s Burden: African Americans and the Philippine War, 1899-1902”  David J. Silbey, Alvernia University,

“Southern Women and the Vietnam War”  Heather M. Stur, University of Southern Mississippi

 

Gillis Theater (500):  “Researching and Writing about the Vietnam War” (A Roundtable Discussion)

Chair:             Edward J. Marolda, Naval History and Heritage Command (ret.)

Panelists:         John M. Carland, State Department History Office

                        John Darrell Sherwood, Naval History and Heritage Command

                        Andrew A. Wiest, University of Southern Mississippi

                        James H. Wilbanks, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

 


Pogue Auditorium (100):  “Causes Lost and Won: France, Austria, and Piedmont: War Planning for Campaigning in Italy”

Chair: John A. Lynn, Northwestern University     

Commentator: Michael V. Leggiere, University of North Texas

Papers:           

“Looking for the Right Way: Habsburg Planning for War in Italy, 1797 to 1809”  Lee W. Eysturlid, Illinois School of Math and Science

“A Well-Coordinated Affair: Franco-Piedmontese War Planning and the Second War of Italian Unification”   Frederick C. Schneid, High Point University

“Austrian and Italian War Planning in 1866”   Geoffrey D. W. Wawro, University of North Texas

 

Marshall Library (40): SMH Professional Development Seminar: The Academic Hiring Process from an Administrator’s Perspective (A Discussion for Graduate Students and Others in the Job Market)

Participants:

Carol Reardon, Director of Graduate Studies, Pennsylvania State University

William Allison, Chair, Department of History, Georgia Southern University

Kurt Hackemer, Associate Dean, College of Arts & Sciences, University of South Dakota

Frank Wetta, Department of History, Kean University, and immediate past Vice President of Academic Affairs, Ocean County College

 

Moody Activities Room (100):  “Strategic Visions in the Age of Fighting Sail, Fulfilled and Unfulfilled”

Chair: Eugenia C. Kiesling, U.S. Military Academy

Commentator: Peter D. Haynes, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School

 Papers:          

“The Tale of the Milk Pot: Vice Admiral Comte d’Estaing’s Strategic Vision for the War of 1778 in America” Michael J. Crawford, Naval History and Heritage Command

“Iron, Fire, and Patriotism: Triumphs and Failures of French Naval Strategy in 1794”  Kenneth G. Johnson, U.S. Military Academy

“A Strategic Vision in Evolution: Admiral Warren and British Strategic Options against the United States, 1812-13”  Kevin D. McCranie, U.S. Naval War College

 

 


Moody Board Room (25):  “The Undersea Cold War”

Chair:  Kathleen Broome Williams, Cogswell Polytechnical College

Commentator: Alex Roland, Duke University

Papers:           

“From the Depths: British Cold War Submarine Operations”  W. J. R. “Jock” Gardner, Naval Historical Branch (UK)

“A Blockade by Any Other Name: Adapting to the Cold War”  Gary E. Weir, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

“Doin’ the Biz; Anti-SSBN Patrols by Canadian Submarines, 1983-87”  Michael Whitby, Canadian Department of National Defence

 

 

Session Five: Saturday, 0830-0945

Shenandoah (50):  “Thought and Practice in Chinese Warfare”

Presidential Panel Sponsored by the Chinese Military History Society

Chair:  David A. Graff, Kansas State University

Commentator:  David A. Graff, Kansas State University

Papers:           

The Seven Military Classics and an 11th-century Military Historian”  Peter Lorge, Vanderbilt University

“Guerrilla vs. Conventional Warfare: Myth-making and Myth-busting in Contemporary Chinese Military Thought”  Morgan Deane, Trine University

“Military Theory and Practice in the Sino-Japanese Korean War (1592-1598): The Continuing Relevance of The Seven Military Classics during the ‘Gunpowder Revolution’”  Christopher R. Lew, U.S. Department of Defense

 

New Market (50):  “The U.S. Cavalry in the Civil War Era”

Chair:  John W. Mountcastle, University of Richmond

Commentator: Samuel J. Watson, U.S. Military Academy

Papers:           

“The Organization and Employment of Cavalry in the East—Another Look”  Ethan S. Rafuse, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

“Hindquarters for Headquarters? Class Rank at West Point and Appointments to the Cavalry Branch, 1832-1861”  Richard N. Grippaldi, Temple University

“A Most Disagreeable Mission: The 1st Cavalry and Bleeding Kansas”  Tony R. Mullis, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

 


Gillis Theater (500):  “On War’s Precipice: The U.S. Army and the Cold War from 1946 to 1962” (A Roundtable Discussion)

Chair:              Brian M. Linn, Texas A&M University

Panelists:         Michael J. Doidge, University of Southern Mississippi  

William M. Donnelly, U.S. Army Center of Military History

                        Donald A. Carter, U.S. Army Center of Military History

                        Ingo Trauschweizer, Ohio University

                        Paul C. Jussel, U.S. Army War College

 

Pogue Auditorium (100):  “Settling Losses”

Chair: L. Michael Allsep, Jr., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Commentator: David J. Ulbrich, U.S. Army Engineer School

Papers:           

“A Cause Lost and Won: Renegotiating Victory in the Memory of the Vietnam War”  Meredith H. Lair, George Mason University

“The Driftwood of War: Managing Refugees in American-Occupied Germany, 1945-1949”  Adam R. Seipp, Texas A&M University

“Acts of Charity: War Department Benefits for Widows, Orphans, and Invalids, 1784-1800”  Christopher H. Hamner, George Mason University

 

Marshall Library (40):  “U.S. Civil-Military Relations in the 21st Century”

Chair: Van Mobley, Concordia University, Wisconsin

Commentator: Michael Bonura, U.S. Army

Papers:

“The Airman and the State: An F-22 Pilot’s Perspective on Civil-Military Affairs”  Alexus Grynkewich, Joint Advanced Warfighting School

 “Joint Vision 2010: Framing Future Forces or Fruitless Futurology?  Christopher E. Sund, Joint Advanced Warfighting School

 


Moody Activities Room (100):  “Religion in the American Military”

Chair: Bradley Carter, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

Commentator: Nancy Gentile Ford, Bloomsburg University

Papers:           

“Atheists in Foxholes?  The Religious Life of the American GI”  G. Kurt Piehler, University of Tennessee

“Bullets Addressed ‘To Whom It May Concern’: American Interpretations of Fate, Providence, and Divine Intervention in Combat”  Jacqueline Whitt, U.S. Military Academy

“’The Lord Has Called Us to a Hard Task’: Chaplain Robert Boston Dokes, Black Soldiers, and the Practice of Transgressive Citizenship in World War II”  George White, Jr., York College, CUNY

 

Moody Boardroom (25): “Rising Stars: The Leadership Origins of Three American Generals”

Chair:  LTG Steven Boutelle, U.S. Army (ret.)

Commentator:  David Murphy, National University of Ireland, Maynooth

Papers:           

“Zachary Taylor and the Crucible of Experience: Democracy, Professionalism, and Leadership in the Antebellum U.S. Army”  Gregory Hospodor, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

“Learning Leadership: Training, Experience, and the Making of Ulysses S. Grant”  Harry S. Laver, Southeastern Louisiana University

“From Vietnam to the Persian Gulf War: The Education of General Colin Powell”  Jeffrey J. Matthews, University of Puget Sound

 

 

Session Six: Saturday, 1015-1130

Shenandoah (50): “Achieving the Complex and the Creative: The Continental Army and Supporting Operations, 1778-1779”

Chair: John R. Maass, U.S. Army Center of Military History

Commentator: Glenn F. Williams, U.S. Army Center of Military History

Papers:           

“Mud Forts and River Pirates: Land Privateers in the American Revolution, 1778”  Charles P. Niemeyer, USMC History

“To ‘Prevent the Enemy from Receiving any Benefit [and] to Supply the Present Emergencies of the American Army’: Foraging and Combat Operations at Valley Forge, February-March 1778”  Ricardo A. Herrera, U.S. Army Combat Studies Institute

“The Road Not Taken: The Coos Country Expedition, 1779”  Holly A. Mayer, Duquesne University

 


New Market (50):  “Civil War in Greece and Spain”

Chair: R. Geoffrey Jensen, Virginia Military Institute

Commentator: Count Niccolo Capponi, Capponi Archive

Papers:           

“The Military Lessons of the Spanish Civil War”  Michael P. Marino, The College of New Jersey

“Success and Failure of Soviet Naval Personnel Serving the Spanish Republican Fleet in War, 1936-1939”  Willard C. Frank, Jr., Old Dominion University (Emeritus)

“The Greek Civil War and the Principles of Operations Other than War”  Kevin J. Dougherty,  University of Southern Mississippi

 

Gillis Theater (500): “Ancient Generalship”

Chair: Michael F. Pavkovic, U.S. Naval War College

Commentator: Michael F. Pavkovic, U.S. Naval War College

Papers:           

“Greek Generalship: Where Did Military Hierarchy Come From?”  Jon E. Lendon, University of Virginia

“Ancient Generals and Their Orders”  Fred S. Naiden, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

“A War Without Battles: Unconventional Warfare in Second Century BC Egypt”  Paul Johstono, Duke University

“Who’s the Best?  Ancient Criteria for Evaluation of Roman Generalship”  Everett L. Wheeler, Duke University

 

Pogue Auditorium (100):  “The Cause Won: New Perspectives on the United States’ Cause in the Civil War Era”

Presidential Panel Sponsored by the Society of Civil War Historians

Chair: Carol Reardon, Pennsylvania State University

Commentator: Joseph T. Glatthaar, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Papers:           

“Seeking the Meaning of Union Victory: Participants, Historians, and ‘The Grand Review’”  Gary W. Gallagher, University of Virginia

“Clasping Hands over the Bloody Chasm: Civil War Veterans’ Reunions and the Path to Reconciliation”  Caroline E. Janney, Purdue University

“’Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable’: Remembering the Won Cause”  Barbara A. Gannon, U.S. Government Accountability Office

 


Marshall Library (40): “Unintended Consequences: The Effects of Air Operations in France, 1944”

Chair:  Thomas A. Bruscino, Jr., U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies

Commentator: Peter S. Kindsvatter, U.S. Army Ordnance Center & Schools

Papers:           

“La Semaine Rouge: Rouen under Allied Bombs”  Stephen A. Bourque, U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies

“Losing the Brains of the Army: The Military Career of Lieutenant General Lesley J. McNair”  Mark T. Calhoun, U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies

“Adapting Precision Airpower: The Transportation Plan in WWII”  G. Scott Gorman, U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies

 

Moody Activities Room (100):  “Informal Responsibilities: Militaries and Roles Short of War in Early America”

Chair: David J. Silbey, Alvernia University

Commentator:  John W. Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Papers:           

“’So Many Cords of Affection’: The Antebellum Military and the Construction of American National Identity”  William Adler, CUNY

“Brothers in Arms: French and Quapaw Indians in Colonial Arkansas”  Sonia Toudji, University of Arkansas

“’Reduced to Order’: State Violence and the Contest over Social Discipline in the Early Republic”  Chris Bray, UCLA

 

Moody Board Room (25):  “The Navy as an Instrument of Foreign Relations”

Chair: James C. Bradford, Texas A&M University

Commentator: C. Thomas Long, George Washington University

Papers:           

“’By Putting Ourselves in a Position to Punish Them’: The United States’ Decision to Fight the Barbary Wars”  Thomas Sheppard, Florida State University

“The Providence of Most Men … and the Longest Cannon”  John A. Tures, LaGrange College

“Churchill, New Zealand, and the Royal Navy: Imperial Relations and Naval Defense in the Pacific, 1911-1914”  John C. Mitcham, University of Alabama

 


Session Seven: Saturday, 1330-1500

New Market (50):  “The Anglo-American Military Experience in the 18th Century”

Chair:   Mark Danley, University of Memphis

Commentator: Dennis M. Conrad, Naval History & Heritage Command

Papers:           

“’The Soul of All Armies’: Discipline, Control, or the Lack Thereof, in the mid-18th-century British Army”  Scott N. Hendrix, Cuyahoga Community College

“’To Recover the Sinking Hopes of the People’: North Carolina and Public Spirit in the American Revolution”  John R. Maass, U.S. Army Center of Military History

“’In Free Liberty of Conscience and Lawful Rights’: The Military Association of Pennsylvania during Two Mobilizations”  Joseph Seymour, U.S. Army Center of Military History

 

Shenandoah (50):  “Comparative Perspectives of the Normandy Invasion”

Chair: Jay B. Lockenour, Temple University

Commentator: Harold R. Winton, U.S. Air Force School of Advanced Air and Space Studies

Papers:           

“The Beginning of the End: D-Day in British Cultural Memory”  Sam Edwards, University of Lancaster

“'Portal of Liberation’: D-Day’s Role in American Self-Affirmation”  Michael R. Dolski, Temple University

 

Gillis Theater (500):  “Armies at War amongst the People: Three Case Studies”

Chair: Brian Holden Reid, King’s College, London

Commentator: Michael Neiberg, University of Southern Mississippi

Papers:           

“Butcher and Bolt: Winning Hearts and Minds in Victorian Campaigning, 1872-1899”  Ian F. W. Beckett, University of Kent

“Charles Townshend’s Dilemma: The 6th Indian Division and the Civilian Population of Kut-al-Amara, December 1915-April 1916”  Nikolas Gardner, U.S. Air Force Air War College

“War without Mercy?  American Armed Forces and the Deaths of Civilians during the Battle for Saipan, 1944”  Matthew Hughes, U.S. Marine Corps University

 


Pogue Auditorium (100): “Coping with Causes Lost and Won”

Chair: Lisa Mundey, University of St. Thomas

Commentator: Andrew A. Wiest, University of Southern Mississippi

Papers:           

“Scar Wars: Injured Servicemen and Comparative Suffering in Early Postwar Japan”  Lee Kennedy Pennington, U.S. Naval Academy

“Forgetting Korea: Civil-Military Relations and Trauma after Korea”  Aaron B. O’Connell, U.S. Naval Academy

“Thailand’s ‘Victory’ in the Vietnam War: Recalling the Personal and Professional Triumphs of America’s Southeast Asian Ally”  Richard A. Ruth, U.S. Naval Academy

 

Marshall Library (40):  “Recapturing Lost Memories of the First World War”

Chair:  Mark A. Snell, Shepherd University

Commentator: G. Kurt Piehler, University of Tennessee

Papers:           

“E. M. Viquesney’s Spirit of the American Doughboy and American Memory of World War I”  Steven Trout, Fort Hays State University

“What Is To Become of Those Dead Over There?”  Lisa M. Budreau, Office of the U.S. Army Surgeon General

“The Memory of the Great War in the African-American Community”  Jennifer D. Keene, Chapman University

 

Moody Activities Room (100):  “Jihad, Terror, and National Defense”

Chair:  Adrienne R. Lauzon, Joint Advanced Warfighting School

Commentator:  William T. Dean III, U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff College

Papers:           

“The War at Home: Responding to Terrorism and Racketeering in France during the Algerian Conflict”  Barnett Singer, Brock University

“The Roots of the Israeli Army”  Robert B. Kane, U.S. Air Force Historical Research Agency

“The Influence of History upon Modern Jihadists”  Michael A. Palmer, East Carolina University

 


Moody Board Room (25):  “Army Special Operations Forces in the Korean War”

Chair:  Robert P. Wettemann, Jr., U.S. Army Special Operations Command History Office

Commentator: Charles H. Briscoe, U.S. Army Special Operations Command History Office

Papers:           

“Special Operations Reaction to the Korean War”  Eugene G. Piasecki, U.S. Army Special Operations Command History Office

“Rangers in the Korean War”  Kenneth Finlayson, U.S. Army Special Operations Command History Office

Ad hoc Special Operations Units in Korea”  Troy J. Sacquety, U.S. Army Special Operations Command History Office

“Psychological Warfare Units in Korea”  Robert W. Jones, Jr., U.S. Army Special Operations Command History Office

 

 

Session Eight: Saturday, 1515-1645

Shenandoah (50):  “The British Army: Winning the Wars and Losing the History, 1899-1945”

Chair: Howard J. Fuller, University of Wolverhampton

Commentator: Howard J. Fuller, University of Wolverhampton

Papers:           

“The British Army and the Boer War, 1899-1902”  Spencer Jones, University of Wolverhampton

“The British Army and the First World War, 1914-1918”  Stephen Badsey, University of Wolverhampton

“The British Army and the Second World War, 1939-1945”  John Buckley, University of Wolverhampton

 

Gillis Theater (500):  “Waterloo Commanders: New Interpretations of Decision-making at Waterloo”

Chair: Frederick C. Schneid, High Point University

Commentator: Donald D. Horward, Florida State University (Emeritus)

Papers:

“Napoleon and the Waterloo Campaign: Observations on the Strategy, Operations, and Tactics of the Campaign”  Robert M. Epstein, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

“’To Defeat the French’: Wellington, Military Planning, and the Waterloo Campaign”  Hew J. Davies, King’s College, London

“Bluecher, Decisive Victory, and Waterloo: The Long Road to a Prusso-German Way of War”  Michael V. Leggiere, University of North Texas

 


Pogue Auditorium (100):  “Auxiliaries for Empires”

Chair: Terry L. Beckenbaugh, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

Commentator:  Robert P. Wettemann, Jr., U.S. Army Special Operations Command History Office

Papers:           

“Turning Their Own against Them: Indian Auxiliary Units in the American Southwest, 1870-1886”  Adam C. Kane, U.S. Naval Institute

“Hope and Glory?  The Experience of the Imperial Service Troops of British India”  Derek W. Blakeley, McNeese State University

“Oral Histories of Black Veterans of the Rhodesian Army and Police”  Timothy J. Stapleton, Trent University

 

Marshall Library (40): “Covert Commandos: The Impact of OSS and CIA Paramilitary Operations on World War II and the Early Cold War”

Chair: Matthew Penney, Central Intelligence Agency

Commentator: Matthew Penny, Central Intelligence Agency

Papers:           

“’The Initial Arrow of Penetration’: The OSS and the Origins of Special and Covert Paramilitary Operations, 1942-1947”  Clayton D. Laurie, Central Intelligence Agency

 “The Development and Application of the CIA’s Covert Paramilitary Function in the Early Cold War, 1946-1961”  Nicholas Dujmovic, Central Intelligence Agency

 “CIA Paramilitary Operations in Southeast Asia, 1961-1975: Findings in Recently Declassified Histories and Documents” David Robarge, Central Intelligence Agency

 

Moody Activities Room (100):  “Military Tribunals during the Philippine Insurrection: Courts Martial, Military Commissions, and Army Lawyers”

Chair:  Timothy K. Nenninger, National Archives

Commentator: Andrew J. Birtle, U.S. Army Center for Military History

Papers:           

“Courts Martial of U.S. Officers”  Gary Solis, Georgetown University Law Center

“Prosecuting the Insurgents”  Gary M. Bowman, Judge Advocate General’s Corps

“JAG George Davis and the Role of Military Law”  Frederic L. Borch, Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School

 


Moody Board Room (25):  “Modernization of the Mounted Arm in the United States Army, 1920-1945”

Chair:  John T. Broom, Norwich University

Commentator: George F. Hofmann, University of Cincinnati (Emeritus)

Papers:           

“’There Is No Substitute for Cavalry!’  The Life of Major General John K. Herr, Last Chief of Cavalry” Bob Seals, Norwich University

“Putting the Cart before the Horse: Strategy, Technology, and the Failure of the United States Cavalry to Innovate during the Interwar Years”  Alan M. Anderson, Norwich University

“McNair’s Cavalry”  Christopher N. Prigge, Harvard University

 

 

Session Nine: Sunday, 0830-1000

Shenandoah (50):  “More Causes Lost and Won in Military Medicine”

Chair:  Dik Daso, Smithsonian Institution

Commentator:  Bob A. Wintermute, Queen’s College, CUNY

Papers:           

“Nurses in Vietnam: Reluctant Volunteers or Compassionate Servants?” John R. “Ron” Milam, Texas Tech University

“Into the Domain of Medical Science: Circular No. 2 and the Development of Scientific Medicine during the American Civil War”  Shauna Devine, University of Western Ontario

“’An Object of Public Attention’: Late 18th Century Military and Naval Medicine and the Literature Campaign against Yellow Fever”  Monica Ayhens, University of Alabama

 

New Market (50):  “Germany 1933-1945: ‘Enemies’ on All Fronts”

Chair:  Dennis Showalter, Colorado College

Commentator: Jay B. Lockenour, Temple University

Papers:           

“Destroying German Ground Forces in Northwest Europe: Application of Force and Operational Tempo”  John N. Rickard, Directorate of Army Training (CAN)

“’The Situation Is Once Again Quiet’: Gestapo Crimes in the Rhineland, Fall 1944”  Michael P. McConnell, University of Tennessee

“Stabbed in the Back: German-Jewish Veterans under Hitler”  Michael J. Geheran, Clark University  

 


Pogue Auditorium (100):  “New Paradigms in War: Enemies, Friends, and Others”

Chair:  Jonathan Reed Winkler, Wright State University

Commentator: Jonathan M. House, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

Papers:           

“Forging Trust by Planning for War, 1948-1968: Civil Emergency Planning and the Creation of the Franco-German Special Relationship”  Nicholas J. Steneck, Florida Southern College

“The U.S. Army and the Repatriation of Soviet Citizens in Austria, 1945-1948”  Ralph W.  Brown III, University of Louisiana, Monroe

“Holding ‘with a Firm Hand’: The U.S. in French North Africa, 1942-1943”  J. Casey Doss, U.S. Military Academy

 

Marshall Library (40):  “How to Lose an Empire: Three Pre-Modern Case Studies”

Chair: Sarah C. Melville, Clarkson University

Commentator:  Kelly DeVries, Loyola University, Maryland

Papers:           

“The Qadi of Xelb’s ‘Invincible Fortress and the Decline of a Medieval Empire”  Dana Cushing, Independent Scholar

“The Criteria for Winning and Losing: The Chinese Righteous War Tradition and the Judgment of Wars in the Spring and Autumn Period”  Cheng-yun Chang, Kansas State University

“The Failure of Sparta”  David L. Berkey, California State University, Fresno

 

 

Session Ten: Sunday, 1030-1145

Shenandoah (50):  “Military Cross-currents in Africa”

Chair:  Bruce Vandervort, Virginia Military Institute

Commentator:  Paul Melshen, U.S. Marine Corps Joint Advanced Warfighting School

Papers:           

“Troops of an Admirable Order: The British Military and the Origin of the Crown Colony of Sierra Leone”  Dawn M. Hewitt, University of Calgary

“’Too Late’: Public Opinion and the Sudan Campaign of 1884-1885”  Joseph M. Bickley, San Diego State University

“British Intelligence in the South African War, 1889-1902”  Fransjohan Pretorius, University of Pretoria

 


New Market (50): “Ordinary Men in Extraordinary Times: Military Leadership in Early America, 1675-1783”

Chair: Guy Chet, University of North Texas

Commentator: Ira D. Gruber, Rice University (Emeritus)

Papers:           

“Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Major Samuel Appleton and the Colonies of Massachusetts Bay and Connecticut during King Philip’s War, 1675-1676”  Kyle F. Zelner, University of Southern Mississippi

“Chosen to Lead: New England Provincial Officers in the Early French Wars, 1689-1748”  Steven C. Eames, Mount Ida College

“Loyalist Leadership in the Revolutionary South”  Jim Piecuch, Kennesaw State University

 

Pogue Auditorium (100):  “Americans at War in Vietnam”

Chair: Spencer C. Tucker, ABC-Clio

Commentator:  Alexander S. Cochran, Office of the Chief of Staff Army

Papers:           

“The Marine Corps Way:  Combined Action Platoons in Vietnam”  John Southard, Texas Tech University

“Men at Arms: Chivalry and the American Experience in Vietnam”  Christopher  J. Levesque, University of Alabama

“U.S. Commitment and Defeat in Southeast Asia”  John Prados, George Washington University

 

Marshall Library (40):